The revamped Microsoft Store is one of Windows 11’s key new features. Alongside a complete visual redesign, it will now include a much wider range of apps, including those you’d usually find on Android via the Amazon Appstore.

There’s also much more of an incentive for software makers to produce apps specifically for the Microsoft Store. Developers will be able to provide applications in the Win32 format (still the most popular) and keep the majority of the money made for themselves.

As a result, plenty of new apps continue to be announced for the Microsoft Store. The Edge browser is among the latest, joining the likes of Zoom, OBS and Adobe Acrobat Reader. It’s no wonder we wrote an article shortly after Windows 11 was announced, explaining how the new Microsoft Store has made a promising start.

While that’s still the case, there is one key caveat that people should be aware of.

No central updates via the Microsoft Store in Windows 11

In the official Microsoft Store documentation for software developers, Microsoft reveals something that may be a cause for concern. For all Win32 apps made available in the Store, it’s the developers’ responsibility to keep them updated using their own methods.

This was the case prior to the release of Windows 10, but it means the burden is on individual users to check if there are any updates available – Windows 11 won’t download them automatically. Getting back into the routine of regularly checking will be important, as otherwise you’re risking running outdated apps with known security gaps.

Of course, this only applies to a small percentage of the total apps available via the Microsoft Store. Each of these is indicated with a ‘Provided and updated by’ tag below its title, as you can see below.

Windows 11 Microsoft Store app
Image: Microsoft

This doesn’t invalidate all the good work Microsoft has done to make the Store more appealing on Windows 11. It just emphasises the importance of everyone making sure their apps are up to date. The security of your laptop or PC relies on it.

A version of this article was originally published in German on our sister site, PC-Welt.

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